Andrea Busfield Bibliography Examples

Where are you from? England.
Who are your favorite writers?
Louis de Bernieres, Colin Bateman, Joseph Heller, Barbara Kingsolver, Isabel Allende. To be honest I'm a pick n mix kind of reader.
Which book/books have had the biggest influence on your writing?
Birds Without Wings (Louis de Bernieres)
Wuthering Heights (Emily Bronte)
What are your hobbies and outside interests?
Music, friends, my family and my dog.
What is the single best piece of advice anyone ever gave you?
"Don't read beauty magazines - they will make you feel ugly." Everybody's Free (To Wear Sunscreen) by Baz Luhrmann.
What is your favorite quote?
"All right, I'm coming out. Any man I see out there, I'm gonna shoot him. Any sumbitch takes a shot at me, I'm not only gonna kill him, but I'm gonna kill his wife, all his friends, and burn his damn house down."-Clint Eastwood in Unforgiven.
What is the question most commonly asked by your readers? What is the answer?
Is this autobiographical?
No.
What inspired you to write your first book?
Love - for my boyfriend, and for a country that deserves so much more.
Where do you write?
On my lap on a laptop. I don't have much furniture!

“In her indelible first novel, Busfield, a British journalist who has lived in Afghanistan, describes post- Taliban Kabul from the viewpoint of precocious, 11-year-old Fawad.... Poetic, bawdy, hilarious, and achingly wise, Busfield's debut is a love story many times over: between a man and a woman, the author and Afghanistan, and an irrepressible boy and the wild world at large.” —Gillian Engberg, Booklist (starred review)

“In her debut novel [Busfield] does a bang-up job of channeling an 11-year-old boy named Fawad. Born Under a Million Shadows is set in Kabul after the fall of the Taliban in late 2001. Fawad's father and brother have been killed and his sister kidnapped by the Taliban.... Fawad--ever resourceful and not above a little chicanery--makes small change by stealing from the foreigners who have flooded the city. Things might be tough for Fawad, but he's filled with an impish optimism. . . . There's much love in this gentle, buoyant tale -- romantic and otherwise. And to experience it through the eyes of a beguiling, mischievous little boy is sheer joy.” —Donna Marchetti, Plain Dealer (Cleveland)

“Andrea Busfield's lyrical novel, Born Under a Million Shadows, chronicles the life of an impish 11-year-old boy in Kabul.” —Marie Claire

“Readers who like to explore other cultures and current events through fiction will find here an intriguing picture of contemporary Afghanistan.” —Library Journal

“Fawad's … More…

“In her indelible first novel, Busfield, a British journalist who has lived in Afghanistan, describes post- Taliban Kabul from the viewpoint of precocious, 11-year-old Fawad.... Poetic, bawdy, hilarious, and achingly wise, Busfield's debut is a love story many times over: between a man and a woman, the author and Afghanistan, and an irrepressible boy and the wild world at large.” —Gillian Engberg, Booklist (starred review)

“In her debut novel [Busfield] does a bang-up job of channeling an 11-year-old boy named Fawad. Born Under a Million Shadows is set in Kabul after the fall of the Taliban in late 2001. Fawad's father and brother have been killed and his sister kidnapped by the Taliban.... Fawad--ever resourceful and not above a little chicanery--makes small change by stealing from the foreigners who have flooded the city. Things might be tough for Fawad, but he's filled with an impish optimism. . . . There's much love in this gentle, buoyant tale -- romantic and otherwise. And to experience it through the eyes of a beguiling, mischievous little boy is sheer joy.” —Donna Marchetti, Plain Dealer (Cleveland)

“Andrea Busfield's lyrical novel, Born Under a Million Shadows, chronicles the life of an impish 11-year-old boy in Kabul.” —Marie Claire

“Readers who like to explore other cultures and current events through fiction will find here an intriguing picture of contemporary Afghanistan.” —Library Journal

“Fawad's observations and concerns about his new experiences living with English-speaking, godless foreigners are told with humor and heartbreak. One of his primary concerns is the poignant love story involving his beloved British landlady and wealthy, yet dangerous Afghan Haji Khan. Busfield tells this story through the eyes of a child, reflecting the optimism and humanity of the resilient people she encountered while she lived in Kabul, a refreshing viewpoint not conveyed in other contemporary novels about Afghanistan.” —School Library Journal

“From the first page, this beautifully told tale will capture the reader's heart and imagination.... Powerful and moving.” —The Sun (UK)

“Beautifully written, touching and laced throughout with humor.... A stunningly assured debut novel from a writer who looks set to be a big star.” —The News of the World (UK)

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